Tag Archives: fiction

Corruption of Power: By George Eccles

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Synopsis:
Independent troubleshooter, Alex Leksin, is recruited by Prime Minister Saidov when the plan to reduce Russia’s reliance on an ever more hostile Europe is put at risk. Hell bent on expansion, President Karpev’s strategy is first to shift the markets for his country’s vast energy resources to the East and Saidov has been charged with overseeing a planned pipeline for Russia’s oil through Turkmenistan and Afghanistan to access these markets. Failure could mean catastrophe, spreading the conflict raging in the Middle East to Russia’s own borders.

Fearful that the pipeline deal might be tilting off course, Leksin has only twelve days to report back before Karpev is due to sign the pipeline contract with the Turkmen President in Ashgabat.

His investigation begins in Moscow at the conglomerate responsible for planning and funding the pipeline. Once the province of larger-than-life oligarch, Lev Usenko, the group is now run by his daughter, Vika, the woman Leksin was once to marry. Trickier still is the prospect of dealing with her embittered brother, Max.

Against a background of political corruption, state-sponsored terrorism and increased Taliban insurgency, Leksin moves on to Turkmenistan, one of the world’s most sinister countries, right at the heart of Central Asia. Initially his enquiries reveal nothing to cause alarm. Other factors, though, suggest otherwise: wherever Leksin goes, someone tries to kill him; people in a position to help him are assassinated; and information turns out to be misinformation.

And when at last he discovers the truth, he finds himself unsure of whom he can trust as the stakes get frighteningly higher.

George Eccles photo

Author Bio:
George Eccles, writing as G W Eccles, graduated from the London School of Economics with a law degree and subsequently became a partner in one of the major international financial advisory firms.

In 1994, George left London to move to Russia and Central Asia during the tumultuous period that followed the breakup of the Soviet Union. His work involved extensive travel throughout Russia, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan – often to places with restricted access to foreigners. During his time there, he advised a number of real-life oligarchs how best to take advantage of the opportunities that became available as regulation crumbled and government became increasingly corrupt. Against this background, while his novels are fiction, many of the anecdotes and scenes are inspired by actual events.

His first thriller: The Oligarch, was awarded a Silver Medal both at the Global E-book Awards 2013 and at the Independent Publishers Book Awards 2013, as well as being selected as IPPY Book of the Day.

George is married and now lives with his wife in a hilltop village not far from Cannes in the South of France.

LINKS TO AUTHOR:

Website: http://www.gweccles.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/gweccles

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/george.eccles.52

WHERE TO BUY:

Corruption of Power on Amazon: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Corruption-Power-G-W-Eccles-ebook/dp/B018XXLKAE

Interview with George Eccles:

1. What inspired you to write Corruption of Power?
Corruption of Power is the second in what I see as the Leksin thriller series, the first being The Oligarch. They are both based in Russia and what many people regard as Russia’s soft underbelly, the Caucasus and the Central Asian republics. I lived and worked in these regions for over ten years and, until fairly recently, still had business interests that required regular visits.
I think my inspiration to write thrillers set there stemmed out of my own personal experiences and observations. Life there, particularly business life, was very different. I was in Russia during the effective birth of the oligarchs when a weakened Yeltsin government sold the nation’s ‘crown jewels’ to a handful of individuals for a song. At this time, if you headed companies in certain industries (such as natural resources or banking), you ran a severe risk of a shortened life span. The man who lived in the flat the other side of the forecourt of my apartment block used to sit on his balcony and clean his guns on Sunday mornings. The IMF loaned over four billion dollars to Russia, which simply got ‘lost’ a couple of weeks later. In Central Asia, being based in Almaty in Kazakhstan, it took me three days every time I wanted to fly to Ashgabat to visit my office there, even though a direct flight (if there had been one) would have taken 2-3 hours. Judicial decisions were based not on evidence, but on the weight of the bribes. Large conglomerates ran major commercial activities ‘off book’.
To be honest, it was a gold mine for a budding writer.

2. Do you have a specific writing style?
I unashamedly write thrillers, so my style is to try and keep the action moving as fast as possible while, from time to time, giving the reader a chance to pause for breath. I keep the chapters short as a means of keeping the action flowing.
My hero is Alex Leksin, an independent troubleshooter, and whenever he appears in the book, the story is told from his point of view. If he’s not around and the scene includes one of the half-dozen main characters, then it’s told from their point of view.

3. How did you come up with the title?
Corruption of Power is a political thriller involving two governments: one Russian, the other Turkmen. Both are essentially corrupt, though in different ways; and both are looking to extend their power base, though again in different ways. In an earlier draft, I had the Lord Acton quote on the first page – “Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely” – and a different title, but in the end I decided to reflect the quotation in the title but drop the actual quotation.

4. Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
Not really, it’s a thriller and designed above all to entertain. Given the unfamiliar locations in which it’s based, I hope it will also give the reader an insight into these countries and life there.

5. How much of the book is realistic?
Corruption of Power is fiction, although the key premises that Russia is looking both to expand into some of its former states (e.g. Crimea and Eastern Ukraine) and to reduce its reliance on Western markets for its natural resources (e.g. the recently announcement pipeline to China) are real. Similarly the threat that ISIS poses is real – not just to Russian aircraft bringing holidaymakers back home, but also in the soft underbelly like Chechnya and Dagestan where there is a strong Muslim population, many of whom see Russia as the oppressor.
A number of the anecdotes in the book are real, and generally the locations used are all ones I knew well from my own time in the region.

6. Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
A lot of the frustrations that Leksin encounters are based on my own in the region (e.g. the discomfort of travelling, staying at the Nissa Hotel, being followed for the day by the KNB in Ashgabat).
The character of Leksin, and the role he plays, is certainly influenced by someone I came across when I lived in Moscow. He had a very similar job, being called in to sort out major business issues in an unconventional way – and in those days, there were plenty of major business issues. Large companies were haemorrhaging cash by the millions as management bled them dry and transferred corporate money into their own Swiss bank accounts.

7. What books have most influenced your life most?
All John Le Carre books (see below)

8. If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
John Le Carre. There are plenty of excellent thriller writers, but so far as I’m concerned, Le Carre is in a class of his own. If Leksin (as he develops) can be half as good as Smiley, then I’ll really feel I’ve achieved something.

9. What book are you reading now?
I’m just about to start Dictator by Robert Harris.

10. Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
New to me rather than new, perhaps, is Nick Louth, who had a breakthrough moment last year with ‘Bite’ which I thought was excellent.

11. What are your current projects?
I am in the middle of the third in the Leksin thriller series. It’s inspired by actual events: a group of individuals lost vast sums in an abortive Moscow investment, and then each of them met mysterious deaths. That is true. What’s fiction is that Leksin is brought in to investigate.

12. Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
Can I answer this by naming a group? The literary bloggers. I have been overcome by how willing people who run book blogs have been to respond to my requests to help promote Corruption of Power. All of them have been kind, helpful and encouraging, and I’d like to take this opportunity to express my gratitude.

13. Do you see writing as a career?
Yes, I very much hope so. I’m under no illusions about how hard it is to make a career in writing, but I’m keeping my fingers crossed that Corruption of Power will be sufficiently successful to kick-start it.

14. If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
To be honest, I don’t think so. I wrote and rewrote it so many times over quite a long period, and I am pleased with the result – at least, I think I am, though it’s the readers who will ultimately tell me whether I’m right to be pleased!

15. Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
I’ve always had an urge in the back of my mind to write, but until I stopped being based in Central Asia, I never had time. I should perhaps mention that, some thirty years ago, I wrote a series of books on corporate and employment law published by Tolley’s and Longman, so I was in some ways used to the discipline of writing and the process of going from manuscript to publication.

16. Can you share a little of your current work with us?
I think I’ve answered this in Question #11.

17. Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
The rewriting and editing process is definitely the most challenging. I’m quite methodical in my initial approach to a project and work from a quite detailed plan, so writing the first draft is generally not problematic. However, I’ve found that it takes me much longer to get from first draft to final draft than it does to get from a blank sheet of paper to first draft. It’s after the first draft is ready that the real work begins.

18. Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
As I mentioned, long before I started writing, I travelled a great deal in the regions in which my thrillers are set. A few months ago I returned to Moscow to update myself on how it had changed, to find out where people now ate, and so on, so that this could be reflected in the book I’m now writing.

19. Who designed the covers?
Peach Publishing. Inevitably we went through several drafts before we hit upon one with which everyone was happy.

20. What was the hardest part of writing Corruption of Power?
Changing the story to reflect changes in the geopolitical situation. When I started writing it, Russia hadn’t invaded Crimea, the Russian-encouraged separatists hadn’t started a civil war in the Ukraine, the West hadn’t imposed sanctions, the oil price hadn’t plummeted, the rouble hadn’t halved in value, no one had heard of ISIS and there was no civil war in Syria. All these developments had to be accommodated in the plot.

21. What were the challenges (research, literary, psychological, and logistical) in bringing it to life?
First, finding the time. I don’t write fulltime, I write in spurts. I try to keep up my other interests as much as possible.
Second, research. While most of the locations are places I know well, and while my previous work gave me an insight into the political and administrative background of the countries involved, things inevitably change – and without being on the spot, it requires considerable desktop research to keep up-to-date. Simple details matter – if a reader catches you out on one point, it casts doubt in his mind on the accuracy of the rest. Things change in little ways – when I was in Moscow a few months ago, I found the policemen were polite and Uber was thriving!

My Review:

“Corruption of Power is an action packed political thriller that is beautifully written and artfully plotted, with events mirroring actual real-life conflicts.” Catherine Rose Putsche Book Blog

This is the second instalment in the Leksin series and follows main protagonist, Alex Leksin, who is an independent trouble-shooter, recently recruited by Prime Minister Saidov and President Karpev, to investigate a planned pipeline deal that involves shifting Russia’s vast energy resources to the East. Leksins mission is to check the pipeline deal is above-board. Saidov wants Leksin to give the project a clean bill of health. However, Leksin only has twelve days to report his findings before Karpev is due to sign the pipeline contract with the Turkmen President in Ashgabat. Leksin begins his investigation in Moscow only to discover that the heterogeneous group that are responsible for planning and funding the pipeline contract are his ex-partner and her spiteful brother, Max. Leksins further investigations lead him to Turkmenistan, one of the world’s most sinister countries and from this moment onwards Leksin must be on his guard as he finds killers on his trail who will stop at nothing to eliminate him by assassinating the only people who can help him and that the intelligence he is given turns out to be false and misleading. Leksins mission for the truth leads him from one terrifying situation to the next where the risks of surviving get considerably higher.

This novel explores two governments, one Russia, the other Turkmen, both of which are corrupt and looking to expand their powerbases in different ways. Corruption of Power boasts an elaborate and complex plot, where the twist and turns are particularly surprising and plausible. The strength of the novel lies within the unfamiliar locations where it is based and gives the reader a real insight into the growth and culture there.

Eccles has fashioned a suspenseful and engaging story against the backdrop of political corruption, state-sponsored terrorism and increased Taliban insurgency that I am in no doubt reflect the times in which we live in today. Congratulations Mr Eccles, for bringing us a fundamentally flawed hero who in the face of danger combats adversity through bravery. I look forward to reading more of Leksins adventures.

My Ranking: 5 Stars

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5 Star Review: Tangents By Agatha Rae

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http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00SUMNQHO/ref=cm_cr_ryp_prd_ttl_sol_0

Four uniquely incomparable people, Rick, Anna, Dan and Matylda each wake up in a separate part of a mysterious forest, unaware of their new surroundings, confused and in a state of panic after falling to sleep in their own worlds beforehand. It is not long before each of their paths cross and they soon discover they are all from different times, cities and even counties. Anna is from 2013, Rick is from 2001, Dan is from 2005 and Matylda is from 2004 and they have no clue about why they have all woken up in these endless woods with the unbearably hot sun that shows no signs of retiring. They decide to stick together in the hope that they can find a way out before it gets dark. In their journey for survival against many attacks from gigantic insects, enormous and deadly snakes and trees that come alive that try to strangle them with their roots. They soon discover they need to find refuge that will protect them from the strange forces of Mother Nature before they can figure a way out of this strange sphere without losing their lives.
On their journey to safety they all learn a little about one another as each of them have a distinctive back story. As the story unfolds it becomes clear that each and every one of them seem to be experiencing some kind of turmoil with their loved ones. Anna eventually develops a devastating theory why they are all there and convinces the others that they all share links to overwhelming events in history that will soon take place and they need to get out of this place ASAP. But their biggest obstacle is how to get back to their lives in time to prevent the people they love from what is about to take place.
A highly entertaining and addictive story with plenty of twists and turns to keep the reader guessing why these four uniquely different people have been brought together with an unexpected and breathtakingly good ending that will prompt any reader to wait anxiously for the second instalment.
My Ranking: 5 Stars
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4 Star Review: The Simulations By John Forelli

http://www.amazon.com/Simulations-John-Forelli-ebook/dp/B00U8CR3TQ/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1427979720&sr=1-1&keywords=The+Simulations++By+John+Forelli

This delightful, comical and highly entertaining story starts when the Ray Ality, the main male protagonist goes for a job interview. Ray has high expectations as he is fresh out of college with new ideas about statistical formatting and is excited at the prospect that he will get to use his advanced technical skills in a company that uses the latest software. However, he is soon informed that his duties will be beneath his abilities and accepts the job anyway as he feels it a fair price to pay to start his professional career.
A few days later Ray, greets the Delilah again, the friendly and extremely attractive receptionist and is introduced to the rest of the team he will be working with. He perceives these new co-workers as a strange bunch of people. First Ray is introduced to Tom, who works in Human Resources who tries to lower his starting salary and takes an instant dislike to him as Tom clearly states that Ray wasn’t his preferred choice for the position. Secondly, Ray is introduced to his new cubical partner, Jordan, who listens to classical music and drinks red wine. The rest of the team consists of a woman called Margie, who has a distinctive limp and airs her loud, profound and profane rants out daily on the telephone with her husband that Ray finds very disturbing as she is situated in the next cubical. There are several more strange and eccentric characters he can’t quite work out and ends up befriending Bob, who works in the server room number 42. Bobs sole wish seems to be chomping down on Cheetos, playing the Sims, while smoking weed and eating junk food. Ray finds Bob a welcomed distraction away from his repetitive and mundane tasks he has to perform on a daily basis. In an attempt to win Delilah’s heart over they start to rip data from Delilah’s social media accounts to get the metadata they need to put into her new file. The servers can hack in to all her private messages, email, text messages etc, so it will provide them with a perfect information avatar. Bob combines the source code for the Sims and Eclipse and uploads all of Delilah’s information and pictures to the program and uses it to create her Sim in order to run a number of simulations for Ray to try out. However, the simulations become repetitive as Ray becomes more and more absorbed with the oculus virtual reality headset and is unable to distinguish between two different realities.
Will Rays and Bob’s attempts win over Delilah, the receptionist’s heart? And if so, at what cost?
Highly recommended reading for virtual reality fans that have a sense of humour and enjoy a plot with plenty of twist and turns.
My Rating:
4 Stars

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Highly Recommended for Lovers of a Superior Horror Yarn! “Sterling Gate Books – 5 Star Reviews!”

Gracie Peterson

http://www.amazon.com/The-Surgeons-Son-Catherine-Putsche-ebook/dp/B00JSTLQIO/ref=cm_cr-mr-img

Not for the faint-hearted, The Surgeon’s Son is an aptly-named horror yarn guaranteed to keep you turning pages well into the night.

After four young ladies mysteriously vanish and one is found alive with gruesome wounds, it’s obvious a serial killer’s on the loose. Enter Detective Inspector Marty Bride and team who embark on a thrilling manhunt as they chase their target, a real nutcase who delights in leaving tantalizing clues as to his identity.

The storyline and accompanying tension build beautifully, aided in no small way by crisp narrative and clever dialogue. Highly recommended for lovers of the genre!

My Review: The Fisherman’s Lily By Suzanne Spiegoski

http://www.amazon.com/Fishermans-Lily-Suzanne-Spiegoski-ebook/dp/B00S36O0QI/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1427388619&sr=1-1&keywords=The+Fisherman%27s+Lily+By+Suzanne+Spiegoski

The Fisherman’s Lily is set deep in the heart of New York City. The story begins when the body of a young female Asian is discovered wrapped in an oriental rug. Detective Lily Dietz and detective John Fermont are called into investigate the gruesome murder and soon discover that the unknown victim had been tortured and died from several brutal and horrific sexual assaults. Lily also notices a distinctive beauty spot on the victim’s upper right cheek. However, before Lily can progress any further into the case she must wait patiently for the autopsy results and check the crime scene photographs. Impatient and anxious to find out what happened to the victim Lily appoints a close friend of hers, Dr Janelle Wopelle, to examine the victim’s body ASAP, only to find a number of cryptic clues in the preliminary evidence that provide a link back to Lily’s troubled past. Without further warning another young Asian female is discovered wrapped in an oriental rug by a tramp who manages to call the emergency services. However by the time the EMT arrive the young women dies. Lily notices that although the second victim shows no signs of malnutrition and that her nails are not worn down like the first victim there is however a manmade spot on the second victim’s upper right cheek and Lily is in no doubt that this is the work of the same serial-killer and it’s not long before the autopsy results find the same cause of death, both women died from internal bleeding. Victim number three is soon discovered in a children’s playground in the same fashion as the two previous victims and provides more vital clues as Lily discovers another cryptic message from the killer.
Lily convinces herself that the serial-killer who is responsible for the murder of these three young women is the man who once had raped her back in college and feels an overwhelming sense of guilt for never reporting the rape all those years ago. Lily is suspended from the case for withholding evidence and her boss orders her to go for psychiatric evaluation. Lily convinces herself that the killer will stop at nothing to capture her and will go to any extreme to fulfil his mission and becomes increasingly concerned for her high-profile brother and his family as she senses the killer closing in on them all. As the weeks turn into months and Lily’s suspension is lifted she wonders if the killer is just a figment of her imagination as everyone around her seems to doubt her claims as she has no evidence to back up her theories and senses the killer is having a cooling off period. She decides its high-time to turn the tables and goes in pursuit of the killer alone.
Will lily’s mission succeed? And if so, at what cost? Will there be anything left of her family, or the people who she cares about in this breathtaking, edge of the seat thriller?
The Fisherman’s Lily is a fast paced, exciting read and I would recommend it to anyone who likes crime fiction.
My Ranking:
4 Stars
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5 Star Review: I Truly Lament Working Through the Holocaust By Mathias B. Freese

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00PG3NWRE/ref=cm_cr_mts_prod_img

I truly Lament is a unique and remarkable compilation of 27 Holocaust stories. Each story explores different points of view, concepts and theses all corresponding to the Holocaust. The stories take the reader on a deep, psychological and profound emotional journey into the stark reality of what it was like to live, exist or to die in the inhumane conditions of the concentration camps run by the Nazis. In the opening chapters the stories deal mostly with the plight of Jews in concentration camps that have no choice to endure the cruel and unjustified punishments of the prison guards who would decide their own type of weapon as they saw fit. Many of the men were ordered to dig trenches for hours on end, often resulting in their death as the Nazi ideology behind this cruel task was to wear the men out to a point where they evolved into Muselmänner (the stage before the ovens). Existence in the camps was short, nasty and brutish without meaning. The Nazis kept the men alive upon the barest thread of existence, teased individuality out of them as they wanted the men to loath themselves to their last dying moment. Most vile of all the Nazis wanted the men to willingly go along with their own extermination.
Perhaps the most harrowing of all the stories is “Hummingbird” where a Holocaust survivor tells us his own unique story at the age of 82. Part of him wants to live, and a part of him doesn’t mind dying as his life was so consumed by his existence in the camps that he doesn’t know what it was like to grow up without those horrors. He is damaged in so many ways and feels his life is in transit as he was made to slog through one camp to another in his younger years. He concludes that he now wanders the earth as an old man in search of a planet and the only reason he survived the camps was that his body desired to go on long after his mind had given up.
Mathias B. Freese has created a powerful thought-provoking work of fiction that cleverly examines a number of diverse perspectives on the Holocaust through several different writing styles, ranging from gothic, Utopian, romantic and chimerical. Each and every story will no doubt leave the reader speechless as we follow the few survivors that managed to outlive the brutality and starvation imposed by the Nazis, only to find their lives are full of insecurities and there is no escape from the torment they once suffered. All of which leads me to close and agree that we will never be done with the Holocaust and this book is living proof of that and I fully agree with other reviewers that it should be mandatory reading for all.
My Ranking:
5 Stars

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My Review: Mother Gaia By R.L. Baxter

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Mother-Gaia-Ricky-Baxter-ebook/dp/B00TP4XBR6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1426406243&sr=8-1&keywords=Mother+Gaia+By+R.L.+Baxter

Mother Gaia has come to end the reign of humanity with 10 billion humans on earth as the hearts of men have changed for the worst. It’s time to reclaim her land. Her mission is to eradicate the nuclear tower from her damaged planet. However, in order for her to meet her goal she must prepare for an unexpected battle with a mysterious and powerful cherub who claims he is god. The cherub goes on to kidnap a young girl called Maya, who Mother Gaia has just saved from a horrifying death at the hands of evil men. Maya, reminds Mother Gaia of early civilisation when man used to look after the earth and starts to grow fond of the child, even though her sole mission is to eradicate all life from her planet.
Mother Gaia summons her unbreakable sword, composed of a diamond specially moulded from her crust, a weapon she had hidden in secret and never intended to use and points it towards the distant tower of heaven where Maya has been taken and attempts to kill the fake deity who claims to be god and rescue Maya in the process.
“False god or true god – it matters not to me anymore. I shall destroy your utopia and stain my blade with your blood.”
Mother Gaia is perceived by many as a she-devil as she creates chaos throughout the once peaceful and rich city destroying like an arrow of divine justice an army of over a thousand ships and more.
Will Mother Gaia’s mission succeed? And if so, at what cost? Will there be anything left of humanity in the process?
R.L. Baxter manages to successfully combine a number of experimental, theological and religious inconsistencies that will in effect lead the reader to think and question their own ideology and philosophy. Which leads me to conclude that is an intelligent and exceptional work of fiction I will highly recommend to anyone who enjoys thought-provoking reads.
My Ranking: 5 Stars
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My Review: The Second Coming By Scott Pinsker

http://www.amazon.com/Second-Coming-Love-Story-ebook/dp/B00KT6B3G0/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1425997995&sr=8-1&keywords=the+second+coming+scott+pinsker

“Two men claim to be the Second Coming of Christ. Each claims the other is Satan in disguise. But only one is telling the truth.”
Early on in the opening chapters the reader is introduced to David Shepherd and Michael Waters who have just come away from a religious man ranting in the street. On their journey home they are confronted by a mysterious tribesman who convinces them to come to his church. The tribesman waits patiently for their arrival and breaks the news that he is the second coming of Jesus Christ and goes by the name of Israel.
In this very moment an attractive woman by the name of Margret Magdala sits nursing her drink in a bar and meets a stranger who claims he knows the exact date of her turning her back on God and he can back his story up with truth. The stranger asks Margret to walk with him and follow God. His name is Joe and he claims that he is the second coming of Jesus Christ.
Both opposite parties, David and Margret eventually become strong devoured disciples for their chosen Messiah’s and go on to spread the word and recruit new followers while declaring the other Messiah is Satan. All this leads to a major political divide of liberal and conservative ideology across America, especially Washington DC and Coastal Carolina where the two different Messiah’s reside. Both sides do all they can to discredit each other through various media outlets. Margret with her goddess like looks and charm emerges as the femme fatale of fundamentalism, the divine diva of deliverance and the conservative community love her. David’s popularity with the liberal community soon sky-rockets as he is perceived as an avenging angel for all those victimized by persecution and prejudice.
Joe challenges Israel to a live television debate and the battle of the Gods begins. The prelude of this godly debate continues to dominate the headlines. The main stream media are pro-Israel, while the talk radio universe rally behind Joe. When the fateful day finally comes and the two Messiah’s must share the same stage, it is clear there’s only enough room for one Messiah and this is when the real battle commences with a highly unpredictable ending.
This is a powerful thought-provoking work of fiction that cleverly examines age-old arguments, predicaments and biblical interpretations that are commonly believed concepts by Christians with regards to their salvation on earth and what will happen in the event of the apocalypse and afterlife that follows. S. Pinsker clearly has a great sense of humour as he injects just the right amount of satire to soften the ebb of biblical text and injects plenty of twist and turns to keep the reader guessing the outcome while allowing the reader to think about their own beliefs and ideology. S. Pinsker also has a unique talent for depicting a conceivable pre-apocalyptic phase that will leave many readers, like me waiting anxiously for the sequel.
My Ranking:
5 Stars
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My Review: Germ Warfare (of the Corporate Kind) By Noel Warnell

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Germ-Warfare-Corporate-Kind-Warnell-ebook/dp/B00P0ZYNCG/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1425482879&sr=8-1&keywords=Germ+Warfare+%28of+the+Corporate+Kind%29+By+Noel+Warnell

“At the first sign of a corporate disease in a colleague – tell them. Then reach for this book and inform them of the recommended treatment to get them on the road to recovery as quickly as possible!”
This highly comical and entertaining short guide-book raises awareness to 25 corporate diseases that now lurk in most office environments around the world. Not only does it raise awareness it also shows you how to discover and identify each disease and offers some expert help on how to destroy and disrupt them.
N. Warnell clearly has a great sense of humour as he injects bags of satire and parody along with the use of practical and effective solutions.
Every office should have a copy of this remarkable book to help spread the word about what dangers lurk in corridors, keyboards and meeting rooms.
Keep them coming!
My Ranking: 5 Stars
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